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Dec 2017-publication in Science: Spectroscopic signatures of localization with interacting photons in superconducting qubits (collaboration with Google-Martinis group)

The international team used photons in Google’s quantum chip to simulate the surprising and beautiful pattern of the ‘Hofstadter butterfly’, a fractal structure characterizing the behaviour of electrons in strong magnetic fields. The results, published 1 December in Science, show how quantum simulators are starting to live up to their promise as powerful tools,…
Read more from CQT highlight for non specialists  ” CQT researchers collaborate in quantum simulations on Google’s superconducting chip” and from USBC highlight ” Simulating physics “

 

This work is highlighted in 12 science news including Strait Time phys.orgeurekalertsciencedailytech2.orghousseniawritingtuc.gr , asian scientist, technology networks, nanowerk, alphagalileo, mgronline 

Science 358, 6367, pp. 1175-1179 (2017)

Authors

P. Roushan, C. Neill, J. Tangpanitanon, V.M. Bastidas, A. Megrant, R. Barends, Y. Chen, Z. Chen, B. Chiaro, A. Dunsworth, A. Fowler, B. Foxen, E. Je rey, J. Kelly, E. Lucero, J. Mutus, M. Neeley, C. Quintana, D. Sank, A. Vainsencher, J. Wenner, T. White, H. Neven, D. G. Angelakis, and J. Martinis

Abstracts

Quantized eigenenergies and their associated wave functions provide extensive information for predicting the physics of quantum many-body systems. Using a chain of nine superconducting qubits, we implement a technique for resolving the energy levels of interacting photons. We benchmark this method by capturing the main features of the intricate energy spectrum predicted for two-dimensional electrons in a magnetic field—the Hofstadter butterfly. We introduce disorder to study the statistics of the energy levels of the system as it undergoes the transition from a thermalized to a localized phase. Our work introduces a many-body spectroscopy technique to study quantum phases of matter.

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November 2017: Realizing topological relativistic dynamics with slow light polaritons at room temperature

Authors

M. Namazi, B. Jordaan, C. Noh, D. G. Angelakis, E. Figueroa

Abstract

Here we use a slow light quantum light-matter interface at room temperature to implement an analog simulator of complex relativistic and topological physics. We have realized the famous Jackiw-Rebbi model (JR), the celebrated first example where relativity meets topology. Our system is based upon interacting dark state polaritons (DSP’s) created by storing light in a rubidium vapor using a dual-tripod atomic system. The DSP’s temporal evolution emulates the physics of Dirac spinors and is engineered to follow the JR regime by using a linear magnetic field gradient. We also probe the obtained topologically protected zero-energy mode by analyzing the time correlations between the spinor components. Our implementation paves the way towards quantum simulation of more complex phenomena involving many quantum relativistic particles.

arxiv.org/1711.09346

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May 2017: Quantum Simulators with Photons and Polaritons: Merging Quantum Optics with Condensed Matter Physics

Check our book on “Quantum Simulators with Photons and Polaritons: Merging Quantum Optics with Condensed Matter Physics” by Springer!

This book reviews progress towards quantum simulators based on photonic and hybrid light-matter systems, covering theoretical proposals and recent experimental work.  Quantum simulators are specially designed quantum computers. Their main aim is to simulate and understand complex and inaccessible quantum many-body phenomena found or predicted in condensed matter physics, materials science and exotic quantum

See CQT highlight for non specialists.

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May 2017: A diagrammatic Diagrammatic Approach to Multiphoton Scattering

Authors

T.F. See, C. Noh, D.G. Angelakis, “A diagrammatic Diagrammatic Approach to Multiphoton Scattering”, Phys. Rev. A 95, 053845 (2017)

Abstract

We present a method to systematically study multiphoton transmission in one-dimensional systems comprised of correlated quantum emitters coupled to input and output waveguides. Within the Green’s function approach of the scattering matrix (S matrix), we develop a diagrammatic technique to analytically obtain the system’s scattering amplitudes while at the same time visualize all the possible absorption and emission processes. Our method helps to reduce the significant effort in finding the general response of a many-body bosonic system, particularly the nonlinear response embedded in the Green’s functions. We demonstrate our proposal through physically relevant examples involving scattering of multiphoton states from two-level emitters as well as from arrays of correlated Kerr nonlinear resonators in the Bose-Hubbard model.

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February 2017: Driven open quantum systems and Floquet stroboscopic dynamics

Dimitris Angelakis (left) and Victor Bastidas (right) with collaborators in Germany found a new way to simplify the equations for a driven quantum system, leading to the discovery that driving can protect a quantum state from decoherence

” Pity poor Schrodinger’s cat. As if it weren’t enough to wish a cat into a state of being simultaneously dead and alive, physicists now have an idea for how to keep it that way – and the answer is to shake it. ….”
Read more from the CQT highlight for non specialists “Shaking Schrodinger’s cat may protect it from the environment”

Authors

Sebastian Restrepo, Javier Cerrillo, V. M. Bastidas, D. G. Angelakis, T. Brandes, “Driven open quantum systems and Floquet stroboscopic dynamics”, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 250401 (2016)

Abstract

We provide an analytic solution to the problem of system-bath dynamics under the effect of high- frequency driving that has applications in a large class of settings, such as driven-dissipative many-body systems. Our method relies on discrete symmetries of the system-bath Hamiltonian and provides the time evolution operator of the full system, including bath degrees of freedom, without weak-coupling or Markovian assumptions. An interpretation of the solution in terms of the stroboscopic evolution of a family of observables under the influence of an effective static Hamiltonian is proposed, which constitutes a flexible simulation procedure of nontrivial Hamiltonians. We instantiate the result with the study of the spin-boson model with time-dependent tunneling amplitude. We analyze the class of Hamiltonians that may be stroboscopically accessed for this example and illustrate the dynamics of system and bath degrees of freedom.